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3 Cueing Techniques to Enhance Your Group Fitness Classes

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Working on your cueing techniques is a great way to improve your group fitness classes in 2018. After all, cueing can make or break a class. And we’re not just talking about the words you use—your mind, body and voice all work together to communicate the exercises or instructions.

The first step to improving your cueing techniques is to recognize the different learning styles of your participants. Most individuals have a preferred learning style, but many people thrive with a combination of two or more of the following learning methods:

Auditory – learn through hearing. These people learn by listening to instructions and verbal cues. Visual – learn through seeing. These individuals learn through visual tactics and seeing physical movements demonstrated. Kinesthetic – learn by doing. These people learn by executing and practicing the movement with manual adjustments.

You can improve your cueing techniques through the use of voice inflection, nonverbal cueing and visualization cueing to cater to the different learning styles of your participants.  

Voice Inflection

Have you ever been bored during a presentation? If so, why were you bored? Other than the topic, most people become bored because of a lack of voice inflection by the speaker.

In fitness, many instructors use one of two extreme methods of cueing: monotone (which many find boring) or loud and brash (which can be alarming or irritating). While militant cueing might be appropriate for a boot camp-style class, most classes work better with a moderate style of cueing that incorporates different pitch tones. Voice inflection strengthens an instructor’s skillset and makes the workout more enjoyable and engaging.

The voice you use as an instructor should, of course, be a reflection of your personality, but it’s also an effective way to set the tone for the class. A quiet, peaceful voice is more appropriate for a stretch or yoga class, while a cheerleading or upbeat delivery works better for higher-intensity classes.

How can you improve your voice inflection? Here are some ideas to help you get started:

Film your class and rate your performance. Do you like what you heard? Take classes from a variety of instructors. What did you like? What did you dislike? What instructors did you gravitate toward? Join a speech class or meet-up group like Toast Masters. Nonverbal Cueing

Nonverbal cueing uses all or parts of your body to instruct a movement. For example, while instructing a

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