November 21, 2017

728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads

Anne Hathaway sings Google Translate hits with Jimmy Fallon – CNET

THIS POST WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON THIS SITE Click Here To Read Entire Article

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives.


fallhath.jpgEnlarge Image

{{content}}

“,”setContentOnInit”:false}’>

Felonious, but melodious.


The Tonight Show/YouTube screnshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Google Translate is the perfect algorithmic Esperanto for our times.

It offers words placed together in such a random, lifeless manner that you feel perfectly ready for the robot revolution.

On “The Tonight Show,” host Jimmy Fallon co-opted Anne Hathaway to perform some famous songs that had been Google Translated back to English from foreign languages. It’s unclear which languages, but when you see them performed, it really doesn’t matter.

Here we had songs by The Weeknd (did he get that name from Google Translate too?) and Pink. Plus the greatest karaoke song of all time — Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive.”

There’s endless joy in seeing a line like “I can’t feel my face when I’m with you” become “In your presence my front is not felt.”

[embedded content]

How, though, did “I will survive” become “I never punctual”?

The finale — a duet of “Just Give Me A Reason,” originally offered by Pink and Nate Ruess — brings language to a new plane.

“You were a thief, you stole my heart” is surely more uplifting when it’s “You are a felon who took my center.”

And when “just a second we’re not broken just bent” is turned into “yes we now enjoy the broken curve,” I confess a tear formed in the broken curve of my eye.

More than 1 million people have already tuned in to watch this spectacle on YouTube. Perhaps they want to learn the new language, the one we’ll all be speaking, the one that will be the universal lingo running through the chips implanted in our brains.

It will be sweet, sweet music.

Technically Incorrect: Bringing you a fresh and irreverent take on tech.

Virtual reality 101: CNET tells you everything you need to know about VR.

About The Author

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: