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Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering Welcomes Bin He, New Head of Biomedical Engineering Dept., to Campus

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PITTSBURGH, Feb. 5, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — As of February 1, Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Engineering welcomed new Department Head of Biomedical Engineering Bin He to campus as he began his appointment. Dr. He succeeds Yu-li Wang, the R. Mehrabian Professor of Biomedical Engineering, who has served as Department Head since 2008.

As Department Head of BME, Dr. He is committed to research and education at the convergence of engineering, biology and medicine, aiming to produce future leaders and innovators to address grand challenges in medicine and health through engineering innovation. Dr. He is excited to join the faculty at Carnegie Mellon, and has relocated his lab, the Biomedical Functional Imaging and Neuroengineering Laboratory, to the Carnegie Mellon campus.

“The intellectual community and setting at Carnegie Mellon fit very well with my philosophical understanding of biomedical engineering,” says Dr. He. “Biomedical engineering can be pushed from biomedical sciences or from engineering, and CMU is the ideal place to advance biomedical engineering through engineering innovation at one of the finest engineering schools in the world. I’m extremely excited and very much looking forward to surrounding myself with this exceptional intellectual environment and with the top notch people in the College of Engineering, in Robotics, and in the Artificial Intelligence community at Carnegie Mellon.”

Whereas many of the interfaces between computers and the human brain require sensors to be implanted in the brain, Dr. He’s pioneering biomedical engineering research has changed our understanding on what noninvasive techniques for brain-computer interfaces can do for the development of mind-controlled robotics. Dr. He’s primary research goal is to develop novel engineering technologies that can understand brain dynamics, and to leverage these capabilities to develop next-generation neurorobotics.

One area of Dr. He’s research is to improve noninvasive dynamic brain imaging technologies so that they are faster and more spatially precise. The conventional electroencephalography (EEG), while used in every clinic in the world, is essentially a one-dimensional technique that does not provide information about the distributed nature of brain activity. Dr. He’s research is to use the very small electromagnetic signals generated by neurons to produce dynamic three-dimensional images of the brain function and dysfunction.

“Essentially, we attempt to read the extremely small electromagnetic signals generated by neurons, which is equivalent to a small boat in the Atlantic Ocean during a storm. How do you pick up that small signal in such a noisy environment? It is a major scientific and technical challenge to sense, localize, and

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