728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads

Health Law Coverage Helped Many Chronically Ill — But Still Left Gaps

THIS POST WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON THIS SITE Click Here To Read Entire Article

As President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress devise a plan to replace the 2010 health law, new research suggests a key component of the law helped people with chronic disease get access to health care — though, the paper notes, it still fell short in meeting their medical needs.

Research published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that the number of chronically ill Americans with insurance increased by about 5 percentage points — around 4 million people — in 2014, the first year the law required Americans to have coverage, set up marketplaces for people to buy coverage and allowed for states to expand eligibility for Medicaid, the federal-state insurance plan for low-income people. If states opted into the Medicaid expansion, people with chronic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, depression and asthma were more likely to see those gains.

Still, the study suggests, the law fell short in terms of guaranteeing those people could get medical treatment, see a doctor and afford medications.

The study is the first to examine how the health law affected people with these long-term diseases, which require careful and continuous management, and whose treatment drives a vast majority of the nation’s health care costs. If these people don’t get regular treatment they are especially likely to wind up needing emergency care.

Use Our Content This KHN story can be republished for free (details).

“This hones in on the patients that are most dependent on having coverage and access,” said Danny McCormick, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School and senior author on the study. “Most chronic conditions require ongoing treatment. And if you don’t get it, often it results in more expensive care downstream.”

As the GOP crafts its replacement plan, those findings could indicate what elements of the law are worth keeping, and what needs to be addressed. The Medicaid expansion in particular has come under heightened scrutiny from the GOP. This past weekend, a senior aide to President Donald Trump also said the administration wants to turn control of the program over to states, which experts say could result in less funding.

The researchers say their findings suggest reversing the Medicaid expansion would pose significant problems for people with long-term illness.

They used data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System — an annual survey jointly run by state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — to examine

About The Author

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: