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Making The Case That Discrimination Is Bad For Your Health

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Shalon Irving, a public health researcher who worked for the Centers for Disease Control and and Prevention who was studying the physical toll that discrimination exacts on physical health, died just a few weeks after giving birth to her daughter, Soleil. Black women are 243% more likely than white women to die during or shortly after childbirth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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When Arline Geronimus was a student at Princeton University in the late 1970s, she worked a part-time job at a school for pregnant teenagers in Trenton, N.J. She quickly noticed that the teenagers at that part-time job were suffering from chronic health conditions that her whiter, better-off Princeton classmates rarely experienced. Geronimus began to wonder: how much of the health problems that the young mothers in Trenton experienced were caused by the stresses of their environment?

It was later, during her graduate studies, that Geronimus came up with the term weathering — a metaphor, she thought, for what she saw happening to their bodies. She meant for weathering to evoke a sense of erosion by constant stress. But also, importantly, the ways that marginalized people

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