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Massive Gap Between Cancer Deaths In Rich Vs. Poorer Counties Highlight Startling Health Disparities

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Although nationally cancer deaths fell by 20 percent, there are still worrying pockets throughout the country that have had a spike in rates.

The Associated Press: Dying From Cancer: Could Your Location Determine Your Fate?
Americans in certain struggling parts of the country are dying from cancer at rising rates, even as the cancer death rate nationwide continues to fall, an exhaustive new analysis has found. In parts of the country that are relatively poor, and have higher rates of obesity and smoking, cancer death rates rose nearly 50 percent, while wealthier pockets of the country saw death rates fall by nearly half. (Tanner, 1/24)

Los Angeles Times: Death Rate From Cancer Down 20% Since 1980, But Clusters Of High Mortality Remain
The mortality rate due to cancer is falling nationwide, but worrisome pockets of deadly malignancy persist — and in some places have worsened — in regions throughout the country, according to the first-ever county-by-county analysis of cancer deaths across the United States. The death rate attributed to various types of cancer declined 20% between 1980 and 2014, according to research published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. During that time, the number of cancer deaths per 100,000 Americans dropped from 240.2 in 1980 to 192 in 2014. (Healy, 1/24)

This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.

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