728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads
728 x 90 Leaderboard Ads

Communities across the U.S. celebrate the second annual National Day of Racial Healing with concerts, proclamations and programs

THIS POST WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON THIS SITE Click Here To Read Entire Article

BATTLE CREEK, Mich., Jan. 12, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — On Jan. 16, communities across the country will celebrate the National Day of Racial Healing (#NDORH) with events and activities as distinct as their participants. High school students, recording artists, civic leaders, teachers, librarians, college students and more will come together in auditoriums, museums, libraries and churches, or on social networks. The array of activities mark the second annual National Day of Racial Healing, established by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) in 2017 to promote healing as a critical path for ending racial bias and creating a society in which all children can thrive.

“The National Day of Racial Healing showcases commitment by a growing number of people in organizations and communities to put racial hierarchy in our rearview mirror,” says La June Montgomery Tabron, WKKF president and CEO. “The day creates space for people of all backgrounds to come together and begin taking steps in unity toward stronger and more equitable communities.”

The National Day of Racial Healing is part of WKKF’s Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) effort, a national and community-based process designed to bring transformational and sustainable change to communities, while addressing the historic and contemporary effects of racism. “It’s exciting to see how this idea is inspiring people to create events and activities around what’s real and needed in their communities,” Tabron says. “Gathering experiences like these get to the emotional core of changing hearts and minds. They are important groundwork for envisioning and constructing the equitable systems all children need.”

Next Tuesday’s National Day of Racial Healing outreach will touch every region of the country, including:

In the Kellogg Foundation’s hometown of Battle Creek, Michigan, more than 1,200 local high school students will participate in an interactive art and musical performance by national and local artists including J. PERIOD, Isabel Delgado, Kinetic Affect and others, to help promote unity, elevate youth voices and motivate students toward positive action.

“Young people are the lifeblood of nearly every significant social movement that has transformed our country,” said Tabron. “They are not immune to the effects of a racialized society, and it is vital that they too have the space to tell their truth, and in doing so, find commonality with their peers. This experience will equip and empower students to continue the healing process to transform our schools, neighborhoods and community. And, our hope

About The Author

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: