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For Young People of Color HIV Remains a Significant Concern for Self and Community

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MENLO PARK, Calif., Nov. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Click Here for Full Report, Chart Pack and Toplines – A comprehensive new national survey of young adults, ages 18-30, from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds more than three and half decades into the epidemic, HIV remains an issue of deep concern for young people of color, both for themselves as well as for those they know. Few of those surveyed know about advances in prevention and treatment that experts say could end HIV if more widely adopted.

A majority (53%) of young Black adults say they are personally concerned about HIV, including 44 percent who are “very concerned.” Many Latinos also express worry (35% “very concerned,” 12% “somewhat concerned”). By contrast, 61 percent of their white peers say HIV is “not a concern” for them personally today, and another 20 percent say they are “not too concerned.”

About three times as many Blacks (46%) and Latinos (41%), as whites (15%), say HIV today is a “very serious” concern for people they know. Almost twice as many Black young adults (30%) say they know someone who is living with, or has died of, HIV/AIDS, as compared to whites and Latinos (16% each). One in five (20%) Black young people have a family member or close friend affected by HIV.

A third of Black (34%) and Latino (35%) young people say they worry about getting HIV; 16 percent of whites say they worry about their risk.

“An entire generation has been born and grown up without ever knowing a time when HIV did not exist, and they may be the first to see it end. Whether this future is realized rests with those most affected being educated about – and having access to – the latest advances in prevention and treatment,” said Tina Hoff, Senior Vice President, Health Communications and Media Partnerships, Kaiser Family Foundation.

Many Don’t Know about Advances in Prevention and Treatment

PrEP, the pill to protect against HIV, has been called a potential “game changer” in the fight against HIV; yet, in the five years since it was approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), only 13 percent of young adults know about the prevention option.

Among the relatively few young people who have heard anything about PrEP (27%), only 18 percent believe it to be “very effective.” Many also doubt that all who might want

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