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Is Environmental Protection Responsible for the Success or Failure of a Military Mission? Defence IQ Investigates

THIS POST WAS ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON THIS SITE Click Here To Read Entire Article

LONDON, November 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ —

Damage to the environment during a military operation can threaten livelihoods, leading to further instability and tension. By contrast, the preservation of the environment can stabilise an area, fostering long-term security and sustainable development.

Ahead of the 6th annual Military Engineering conference, Defence IQ interviewed one of the event speakers, Dr. Susanne Michaelis, Officer at the Emerging Security Challenges Division, NATO. The exclusive interview delves into the following:

The relationship between environmental protection and security 

The instability and tension caused by environmental damage is exacerbated in vulnerable regions where corruption, terror and organised crime are commonplace. It is well known that overfishing, destruction of arable land, illegal waste dumps and depleted aquifers have driven peaceful farmers to support dangerous warlords.

Environmental protection: How aware are military personnel? 

NATO-led missions aim at bringing security and peace to a host nation. “Among military decision-makers from NATO and partner nations, there is no doubt that the overall success of a military mission includes the protection of the environment,” says Dr. Michaelis.

NATOs three main priorities in environmental protection 

Solid waste treatment Spill prevention and clean up of pollutants Water purification and water management during operations

The most promising developments in sustainable and energy-friendly systems 

The private sector has developed a range of sustainable solutions for deployable camps, including high-impact protection walls that can be filled with local materials such as sand or stones. At the end of a military mission, they can easily be dismantled and returned to their country of origin.

However, Dr. Michaelis makes it clear that more needs to be done to demonstrate the usefulness, robustness and added value of these technologies in order for them to be accepted by the military.

For more insights from Dr. Susanne Michaelis, and on NATOs stance on environmental protection, download the full interview here. Dr. Michaelis will be speaking at the Military Engineering conference, taking place in London from 27th February 1st March 2018. For the full programme and registration details, please visit http://www.militaryengineering.co.uk or email enquire@iqpc.co.uk.

Press are invited to attend this important industry forum; if you would like to receive a complimentary press pass please email Minal Tailor using the details above.

Media Contact: Minal Tailor, Marketing Executive, minal.tailor@iqpc.co.uk or call +44-(0)207-036-1310

SOURCE Defence IQ

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